By Amanda E. Clark

Business2Community, November 18, 2017 —

When you’re seeking new employment, it’s always important to make strong first impressions. This includes your resume—your first and best chance to impress a recruiter or hiring manager. It also includes your conduct during the interview process. If you allow yourself to appear sloppy or haphazard, it could undercut whatever goodwill your resume has engendered.

Pixabay

So what are some of the common mistakes that cause a job search to appear shoddy or unfocused? Here are a few for you to watch out for.

Showing up for an interview without knowing much about the company.

Make it clear that you’re invested in the process, and interested in finding the best possible fit. One way to do that? Spend some time researching the company in advance. Before an interview, read their website, recent press releases, and company blog posts to get a feel for what the business really does and what its culture is like.

Showing up for an interview without knowing which position you’re seeking.

Many companies will be hiring for multiple positions at once. Make sure you know the title and job description of the position you’re applying for. Pay attention to the language used in the job posting—skills needed, etc.—and try to employ some of that verbiage in your interview.

Failing to prepare thoughtful questions for the interviewer.

Questions about the culture, goals, and vision of the company show that you’re invested, and that you care about more than just earning a paycheck.

Dressing way too casually for the interview.

You can generally get a good sense of how to dress from the company’s website or employee LinkedIn profiles; when in doubt, ask your recruiter, or just err on the side of formality.

Showing up to the interview empty-handed.

What should you bring to a job interview? A few extra copies of your resume. A pen. And, a notepad where you can jot down any notes.

Going to the interview, then not following up.

Thank you notes are critical.

Broaching deal-breaking issues at the last possible minute.

Do you need to give a full 30-days’ notice to your current employer? Or to be able to work from home on certain days of the week? If you have any big issues like this, you need to address them early in the process—not once a job offer is made!


Amanda Clark

Amanda E. Clark is the president and editor-in-chief of Grammar Chic, Inc., a full-service professional writing and editing company.